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17/10/2004 12:37:47   paul   I'm looking at an oil change for my V4, but neither the owners manual, nor my Autopress Workshop Manual gives any instructions on this. Is there a better workshop book than this? Haynes or Bentley?

Also, where do I get a new Saab oil filter? Is this still available from Saab dealers?



 
17/10/2004 13:28:21   bill rawles   Try Highgate for filters though I'm happy on non originals myself from any decent motor shop. Champion c102 or Fram ph2857 are the common ones. You can still get the Haynes manuals for the v4 new direct from Haynes, try via their website or the same helpful shop you are about to buy a filter from. It is also well worth spending a few quid on a strap wrench or similar to help remove the filter.

There isn't much to it anyway. Run the engine until the sump is warm - hot oil flows better and will drag out more of any suspended particles that there might be. Get down on your hands and knees and look under the front bumper, on the front right hand corner of the sump is the drain plug. Remove this and be ready with a) an old washing up bowl or similar to catch the oil in and b) a stream of hot oil to run up your arm. Put the drainplug somewhere safe and turn your attention to the engine bay.

The oil filter should in theory just unscrew from the engine block. In practice it will be too tight to unwind by hand so use the strap wrench that you bought earlier. Its a good idea to have some rags under the filter because a cupfull of oil will escape and make horrid mess if you don't. The zero cost but very messy method is to hammer a screw driver through the filter then use that as a lever, it works but is very nasty and there is not much room to swing the hammer!

Fill the new filter with clean oil and smear a bit of oil around the rubber seal then screw it on as tightly as you can by hand. The reason you fill the filter is so that when you restart the engine it doesn't spend the first few seconds filling the filter instead of building pressure within the engine.

By now the sump should have finished draining so refit the sump plug, preferably with a new washer, then fill the engine with new oil up to the dipstick mark and away you go.  
17/10/2004 14:53:11   Senor Burt   V4 oil filters are the same as classic 900 and 9000. Your local auto shop should be able to sort you out. They are certainly not a specialist item.
If you really want one with SAAB written on it, contact somewhere that specialises in 900's etc like Europarts or you could always pay through the nose at your local official SAAB dealer. Even then they're not too expensive.
Haynes manual is OK once you're used to Haynes speak and 'reassembly is a reversal of removal.' How that one little line causes so much cursing, swearing and skinned knuckles!  
17/10/2004 19:09:14   paul   Thanks, Bill and Senor.

I think Highgate do the Saab filters for a fiver. As for draining the oil, my owners handbook usefully points out not to confuse the engine oil plug with the gearbox oil plug, but handily does not give any pictures or further advice.

Is the gearbox oil plug down behind the front bumper too?

 
18/10/2004 10:18:52   Senor Burt   The gearbox plug is on the bottom of the gearbox in the centre. It usually has a square or wierd 'split' fitting.
The engine oil drain is a hex bolt on the side of the sump, so it's difficult to confuse the two.
Are you sure you're OK with this classic motoring caper if you're having this much trouble with an oil change?  
18/10/2004 14:20:20   Alistair   Haynes manuals can be bought new in softback form directly from Haynes (not avaiable retail for some reason).

Make sure you get an oil filter with a non return valve, whatever brand you get (can't go wrong with Saab's own for only a fiver....)  
19/10/2004 11:27:41   bill rawles   Everybody has to start somewhere Burt!  
19/10/2004 15:09:00   Senor Burt   The fun really starts when you break down on a winter night when it's freezing cold and sleeting. It will happen!

No matter how well maintained your classic is, it will always break down at a highly inconvenient moment.

Being able to fix it yourself, will save you an absolute fortune. As well as not having to put up with blank/ sign looks/sharp intakes of breath from mechanics when you tell them you have a SAAB V4.  
19/10/2004 15:31:04   Senor Burt   The fun really starts when you break down on a winter night when it's freezing cold and sleeting. It will happen!

No matter how well maintained your classic is, it will always break down at a highly inconvenient moment.

Being able to fix it yourself, will save you an absolute fortune. As well as not having to put up with blank/ sign looks/sharp intakes of breath from mechanics when you tell them you have a SAAB V4.  


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